INCLEMENT WEATHER


While we try our very best to remain open for our children and their families, there maybe a day or two during this wintry season that we have to close due to inclement weather.  While this may inconvenience some families, we also have to put into huge consideration the safety of our staff members.  In the event that this happens, we will post school closing information through the “Emergency Closing Center” website and also, send out “Preschool2me” announcement to all.  So please always make sure to check your email or the app.  We thank you for your understanding.

IMPORTANT DATES


I2/12/21 (Friday).  KIH Valentine’s Party.

We will celebrate on this day with treats, games and lots more!  Come to school wearing something RED or valentine theme clothing.  Sign-up sheets for treat donations are posted in the office. Part-timers are welcome to join us from 10:00 – 12:00 PM. Just inform your child’s teachers ahead of time.

 

2/15/21 (Monday).  TEACHER INSERVICE DAY.

As stated in our School Year Calendar, we will be closed this day to complete the required DCFS Inservice hours for the school year 2020. 

DAILY PICK-UP


Please be reminded to pick-up your child at the end of the day on a timely manner.  If running late, make sure that you have other people authorized to pick-up on your behalf.  Our staff greatly appreciates  your attention to this matter

​​​​

F E B R U A R Y   2 0 2  1 

 

DIRECTOR'S CORNER


INCLEMENT WEATHER


While we try our very best to remain open for our children and their families, there maybe a day or two during this wintry season that we have to close due to inclement weather.  While this may inconvenience some families, we also have to put into huge consideration the safety of our staff members.  In the event that this happens, we will post school closing information through the “Emergency Closing Center” website and also, send out “Preschool2me” announcement to all.  So please always make sure to check your email or the app.  We thank you for your understanding.

SCHOOL EXTRA CLOTHES


Please check with the teachers if your child needs an extra set of clothing to be left in their classroom.  Also, check to see that your child’s school shoes still fit comfortably.  Perhaps it is time to replace them. 

How to Teach Children About Cultural Awareness and Diversity
(Source: PBS Org.)


​Have you ever had an embarrassing moment where your child (maybe quite loudly) asked you about some characteristic of another person? For example, “Mommy, why does that woman look like that?” The typical parental reaction is to attempt to quiet the child and move on as quickly as possible. As adults we’ve been taught not to ask such questions (at least not out loud). In contrast, children are not yet conditioned to refrain from sharing what they think or asking what they want to know.
Earlier on than most people realize, children become aware of and intrigued by the difference in the way people look and behave. In fact, Phyllis A. Katz, while a professor at the University of Colorado, found babies as young as six-months of age stared significantly longer at photographs of adults who were of a different color than their parents. The research evidence clearly indicates that children notice differences in race, ability, family composition and a multitude of other factors. Their questions are attempts to make sense of those observations so they can make sense of their own world.
As a parent, I know that children tend to ask the most challenging questions at the most inconvenient times. Rather than trying to quiet your child (which implies there is something wrong with the other person or with asking questions) take these opportunities to help your child understand and respect differences and similarities among those in your community. Provide brief, objective responses to their questions. For example, if your child comments about the difference in a person’s skin color tell her, “His skin color is white because his biological parents had white skin.” If your child asks you why a person is in a wheelchair tell him, “There is a medical reason why she is unable to walk by herself, so she uses the wheelchair to get from one place to another.”
By helping your child understand and respect similarities and differences you will also help your child to understand who he is in the context of your race, ethnic group, culture, religion, language and familial history. In so doing, you will provide your child with personally meaningful information and also introduce concepts from anthropology, history, religion, geography, etc.
Use these tips to spark your children’s curiosity about who they (and others) are in their world:

1. I love you / 我愛你 / Te quiero.
Teaching your children words in the native language(s) of your family is a personal way to introduce them to different cultures, as well as family history. What better words to start with than, “I love you”. Moreover, since many classrooms are becoming increasingly diverse, consider teaching your child key phrases, such as “thank you” in a language represented in her classroom, which not only models respect for diversity but could allow her to forge new friendships. There are an abundance of apps that translate and speak words in different languages that can support this effort.

2. Celebrating others.
Children’s books are wonderful resources for helping your child develop a sense of his or her own identity, as well as an understanding of those who are different in terms of race, family composition, religious beliefs and ability. Visit your library for books such as: It’s Okay to be Different (diversity); The Skin You Live In (acceptance); Same, Same But Different (culture and geography); Whoever You Are(diversity); Where Does God Live (religion); What is God (religion); Over the Moon (adoption); Don’t Call Me Special (disabilities); My Brother Sammy(autism); and The Family Book (different family configurations).

3. Exposure to other cultures brings personal meaning.
While children’s books open children’s eyes to differences, actual experiences have the most profound influence on what children think and believe. Here are more hands-on activities you can try:
Encourage cross-racial/ethnic/religious/ability friendships.
Expose your children to foods from different cultures, like classic pork and cabbage dumplings or kimchi.
Attend different events/festivals that celebrate a particular ethnic group, holiday or personal accomplishment, like the Special Olympics, the Chinese New Year or Holi, the Hindu festival of colors.
Whether big or small, children’s or history museums house an abundance of artifacts from different cultures and countries. Since museums can be overwhelming for young children it helps to talk with your child about what you will see, what she wants to learn and then focus on that part of the museum (especially if the museum is large).
Watch movies set in other cultures like My Neighbor Totoro, Kirikou and the Sorceress, and The Red Balloon.

4. The most powerful role model.
While all of the activities listed above have been found to promote cultural awareness and respect, no activity is as powerful as the role model of a child’s parent(s). Children become culturally sensitive and respectful when they see adults who are culturally sensitive and respectful, and who take a stand against bias, racism or insensitivity. Lastly, it is important for adults to take a “strengths based” perspective when talking with children about those who are different from the child. This perspective focuses on the positive characteristics of a person and her abilities, what that person is able to do or does (as compared to what he cannot) and how differences make our world a better place.
By helping your child understand and respect similarities and differences, you will help him realize he is a wonderfully unique person among many other wonderfully unique people on this earth.





A​uthor:
Christy Tirrell-Corbin, PhD is the Director of Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education at the University of Maryland where she teaches a course entitled, Culture and Community Perspectives: The Diverse World of the Child. Dr. Tirrell-Corbin’s research interests focus on family engagement, notably around teachers’ beliefs and practices around issues of race and culture. She also serves as a consultant for several educational organizations, including PBS Kids and National Geographic. Follow her on Twitter @TirrellCorbin.


https://www.pbs.org/parents/thrive/how-to-teach-children-about-cultural-awareness-and-diversity 

Happy “Heart” month to our wonderful KIH family!  Seems just like yesterday when we were huffing and puffing --- trying to keep up with the hectic demands of the Holidays.  Now that the Holiday season is behind us, perhaps we should all remember to be kind to ourselves and take some good, healthy “heart” breaks!  After all, this month coincides with the celebration of the heart --- “Valentine’s Day” and “National Heart Month”. Both young hearts and “young at heart” will absolutely benefit!

 

Following simple guides such as eating healthy, taking time to exercise weekly, getting enough sleep, going to regular check-ups and keeping an upbeat mood --- all help in achieving our goal of healthy living.  I think that I can speak with confidence that these are quite achievable.

 

Looking beyond February, the coming months will absolutely be twice as busy than you know what. So “bee” sure to check our school calendar regularly.  We have a lot of fun-learning activities lined-up for the remainder of this school year! And who knows, a few pleasant surprises along the way---stay tuned…


             

Ms. Genny